FTTH around the world: Some June and Early July Updates

Of course, FTTH news always catches my attention.

Total Telecom quotes FTTH Council Asia Pacific president Bernard Lee’s statement that the FTTH subscriber count in the Asia-Pacific region is expected to reach 100 million in late 2014.

In South Africa, TeleGeography reports that MTN SA has connected it first FTTH subscribers in Monaghan Farm, 30 km north of Johannesburg.  Telkom SA also announced its FTTH plans in suburbs of Johannesburg, Pretoria, Durban and Cape Town.  And Vumatel, in addition to its potential 2,100-home deployment in the Parkhurst suburb of Johannesburg, has announced plans to roll FTTH out to 200,000 homes across 100 locations in South Africa.

In the U.S., Lightwave reported about the progress of the municipal FTTH network in Loma Linda, California (all businesses and 1,600 houses are on-net, with 800 more home connections expected in the next 3 years) and the upgrade of Blue Valley Tele-Communications’ FTTH network serving 7,500 customers across 17 communities in Kansas.

Elsehwere in the U.S., Ethernut reports that a third neighborhood in Ridgeland, MS has passed C Spire’s 45% preregistration threshold required to qualify for deployment of 1 Gbps FTTH.

Richard Jones’ The Business of NGA/FTTX linked to a great telecompaper article noting that Telefonica’s 100,000 new Movistar customers in April and May bumped its total number of customers in Spain past the 800,000 mark.

And in Réunion, TeleGeography reports that Zeop has lit its FTTH network in Beausejour. Because how often do I get to mention Réunion Island?!

That’s just a sampling of recent FTTH announcements. So much going on in so many places! And yet, since I covered the industry in its early stages, I’m always drawn to industry updates.

Hope you’ve enjoyed the recent news excerpts assembled above.

And just for kicks, I’ll close this post with a “Throwback Thursday” link to a February 2002 CED article called “FTTx: An Unreal Reality Takes Shape,” which cited numbers from my 2001 KMI report on the FTTH industry (and in which I’m quoted).

Quick Hits (Fiber Edition): Metro Fiber Deployment, Fiber Leasing, FTTH Speeds, FTTH Penetration

Because of my years as an analyst with fiberoptics research firm KMI, I’ve always noticed fiber deployment articles and press releases.  Here are a few recent fiber network articles:

From a CLEC perspective, tw telecom is expanding its metro network in Nashville from  the city center out to the west side of the city.  This is in line with tw telecom’s November 2013 announcement that it had planned to expand its metro networks to 5 new markets and within at least 27 existing markets within a year.

Elsewhere, Shentel (Shenandoah Telecom) is seeing growth in its fiber leasing revenue.

Another carrier announced its intention to provide 1 Gpbs FTTH service, with Cox joining AT&T and Google Fiber in the FTTH speed arms race.

Turning to Europe, telecompaper reports on the growth of FTTH connection in Spain – 85% year-over-year in January to 650,000.  An interesting point in the article is a statistic about total fixed broadband connections (not just FTTH): A vast majority of new broadband connections were added by alternative network operators, with Telefonica and cable operators adding a much smaller number.

And while we’re on the topic of FTTH, though I don’t really have much to say, this is an interesting read I ran across recently that’s probably worth sharing.  It’s a bit of a chat about FTTH in Africa with some of the writer’s personal experience with an eye to history.  At one point, to put FTTH in Africa in context, it references a Google Africa Blog article that notes “only 16% of Africa’s 1 billion people are online.”  Again, this is a rather disconnected paragraph, but it’s interesting, nonetheless, and worth sharing.

That’s what’s drawn my attention the last few days, at least from a fiber perspective.  As always, the purpose of this blog is to share what I read and some thoughts about it with old friends and contacts in the telecom industry, as well as anyone I haven’t met who will find this interesting.  Obviously, today’s post was more news and less opinion.  Hope you’ve found it helpful.

Quick Hits: Net Neutrality, Paid Peering, Wi-Fi Hotspots, and a Johannesburg FTTH Deployment

I’ve been a little buried lately and haven’t had time to put a lot of thought into another blog post, but lest you miss out on anything, here are a few interesting reads from the last couple of days:

1) Thanks to Todd Spangler’s Twitter feed, I spotted today’s FCC blog post about Net Neutrality by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.

2) Also worth noting is Netflix’s “paid peering” deal with Verizon (along the lines of its deal with Comcast), as per this article on the Time website yesterday.

3) What’s so interesting about that?  Well, perhaps you missed the brouhaha about Netflix VP of Content Delivery Ken Florance’s blog post last week, accusing Comcast of “double dipping by getting both its subscribers and Internet content providers to pay for access to each other,” as quoted in this FierceCable article, which even shows an interesting chart of before-and-after speeds that was included in Florance’s blog post. If you’re curious, here’s the link to the original post in the Netflix blog.

4) Today’s CED article about the CableWiFi Alliance reaching 250,000 hot spots recalls my own post from a couple weeks ago about wi-fi adding value to a landline/cabled brand.  In this case, it added value is the ability to roam.

5) Many of you who know I have a special interest in FTTH – heck, it’s how I made a name for myself, at least among those who knew my work more at KMI than a decade ago.  So you will not be at all surprised that I’m adding this last piece.  Adam Oxford wrote this ZDNet piece about a FTTH pilot in Johannesburg that, per the article, “has laid claim to being the first to offer 100Mbps fibre to the home (FTTH) on the continent.”

That’s an awful lot of links for one blog post, but it’s been more than a week since my last post, so I guess I’m making up for lost time.